Directory of Institutions in the United States and Canada

The Directory of Person-Centered and Experiential Counseling and Psychotherapy University Programs, Courses and Faculty - and Other Certification Programs - in the United States and Canada*

Edited by Howard Kirschenbaum

*Due to practical reasons, Mexico was not included in the data collection for this initial directory, which focused on English-speaking North America, and was edited independently from the broad project entitled Directory of Educational Institutions. To submit entries for Mexican person-centered educational institutions, visit the sectionMexico and Central Americain the link above.

Table of Contents

  1. Purpose of the Directory
  2. Definitions of Person-Centered and Experiential
  3. Categories and Criteria for Inclusion
  4. Process for Building the Directory
  5. Directory Overview by Region
    1. University Faculty
    2. University Courses
    3. University Programs
    4. Institutes
  6. Full Directory Listings
    1. University Faculty
    2. University Courses
    3. University Programs
    4. Institutes
  7. Submission Forms for New Entries
  8. Additional Directory Category: Non-Academic, Non-Credential Offering Institutions

1. Purpose of the Directory

This directory is intended to achieve several goals:

  • To help inform students and potential students who are asking, “Where can I go to be trained in person-centered and experiential counseling and psychotherapy and receive a degree, license to practice, course credit, or other professional credential?”
    There are many other places and individuals not included in this directory that offer training and learning experiences in person-centered and experiential counseling and psychotherapy. To keep this initial project within achievable parameters, this directory only includes higher education institutions and/or those that lead to a professional credential or degree.
  • To facilitate networking among professionals who may benefit from knowing and communicating with their colleagues across the United States and Canada.
    There are graduate programs, institutes and training centers around the world—many more than in the U.S. and Canada — that offer degrees and credentials in person-centered and experiential counseling and psychotherapy. Again, to keep this project within achievable parameters for now, the scope is limited to these two countries.
  • To demonstrate to professionals beyond the person-centered and experiential communities the vitality of the person-centered approach.
    In Europe and other parts of the world, the person-centered approach is one of the leading approaches to counseling and psychotherapy, with numerous person-centered degree programs and institutes, professional associations numbering in the thousands, government and insurance company recognition and reimbursement, and similar indicators of influence. It is hoped that this directory will contribute to both recognizing and expanding the vitality of the person-centered approach in the U.S. and Canada.

2. Definitions of Person-Centered and Experiential

The “client-centered” or “person-centered” approach to counseling and psychotherapy, as originally developed by Carl Rogers (1902-1987) (e.g., Rogers 1951, 1961; Kirschenbaum and Henderson, 1989), may be characterized by:

  • A trust in the client’s “self-actualizing tendency,” that is, the client’s motivation to grow and mature toward health, satisfaction and positive relationships when provided with a supportive environment
  • A reliance on the therapeutic relationship, characterized by the core conditions of congruence, empathy and unconditional positive regard, for therapeutic progress
  • A continuing focus on the client’s inner experience, hence…
  • An absence of directive techniques or perspectives introduced by the therapist, such as questions, interpretation, advice, coaching, and the like (except for relatively rare expressions of counselor congruence)
  • An avoidance of diagnosis, treatment plans and other therapist-centered methods that reflect the medical model’s view of mental illness
  • A view of the client as a whole person in process of “becoming,” that is, becoming a more fully-functioning person. Therefore counseling focuses not simply on a presenting problem but on more holistic change, so the client can continue to grow and exercise self-direction beyond the therapeutic relationship.

One might say these characteristics describe “traditional”, “classic”, or “orthodox” client-centered/person-centered counseling and psychotherapy. Some would prefer to call it simply the “client-centered” approach. Many practitioners and educators practice and teach this approach and a considerable amount of empirical research supports it.

For many other practitioners and educators, there is more than a single person-centered approach. They believe it is possible to introduce certain techniques to further client self-exploration while still remaining essentially person-centered. Thus Virginia Axline (1950) and others (e.g., Landreth, 1991) developed “child-centered play therapy”, in which the child and therapist utilize toys and play in the context of a therapeutic relationship. Similarly, Natalie Rogers (1993), Carl Rogers’ daughter, developed “person-centered expressive therapy” which engages clients and group members in the creative arts and employs empathic listening to help them explore the meaning of their creative expression and its implication for their lives. Eugene Gendlin (1978, 1996) developed “focusing” and “focusing-oriented, experiential psychotherapy” as a method for helping clients tune in to their “inner experiencing” in greater depth, while continuing to use empathic listening as a primary method for furthering that exploration. Leslie Greenberg, Robert Elliott and others developed “process-experiential”, then “emotion-focused therapy” (Greenberg, Rice & Elliott, 1993; Elliott & Greenberg, 2001), which combined the client-centered approach with Gestalt and other techniques to facilitate the therapeutic process. All of these approaches have identified themselves as person-centered and have significant followings around the world. Their proponents would argue that they remain essentially person-centered, with a major emphasis on the core conditions, including a predominant use of empathic listening, and a focus on the client’s inner experiencing.

There is some controversy in the person-centered world today as to whether “client-centered/person-centered” should be used exclusively to describe Rogers’ traditional or classic approach to counseling and psychotherapy, or whether there is room for “many tribes” in the person-centered nation (Warner, 2000). This Directory does not attempt to settle this controversy, but it does take an inclusive approach. A variety of person-centered and experiential approaches are included. Our goal is to give users of the directory—prospective students, faculty, and researchers—enough information to make an initially informed choice of which programs or individuals they may wish to contact for further information.

One final distinction. The term “experiential” in this context is not meant to include all experiential and humanistic approaches. With all respect to our colleagues in gestalt, existential and other humanistic traditions, these approaches are not the focus of this directory, although programs, courses, and faculty who teach and use these approaches as a part of their work may be included (see criteria for inclusion below).

References:

Axline, V. (1947).Play therapy. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
Elliott, R., & Greenberg, L. (2001). Process-experiential psychotherapy. In D.J. Cain & JU. Seeman (Eds.),Humanistic psychotherapies: Handbook of research and practice(pp. 279-306). Washington, DC: American Psychological Assn.
Gendlin, E.T. (1978).Focusing. New York: Everest House. (2nd edition, New York: Bantam, 1982).
Gendlin, E.T. (1996).Focusing-oriented psychotherapy: A manual of the experiential method. New York: Guilford Press.
Greenberg, L., Rice, L., & Elliott, R. (1993).Facilitating emotional change: The moment-by-moment process. New York: Guilford.
Kirschenbaum, H., & Henderson,V. (Eds.) (1989).The Carl Rogers reader. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
Landreth, G. (1991). Play therapy: The art of the relationship. Muncie, IN:Accelerated Development.
Rogers, C.R. (1951).Client-centered therapy: Its current practice, implications, and theory. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1951.
Rogers, C.R. (1961).On becoming a person: A therapist’s view of psychotherapy. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
Rogers, N. (1993).The creative connection: Expressive arts as healing. Palo Alto, CA: Science and Behavior Books.
Warner, M. (2000).Person-centered psychotherapy: One nation, many tribes. Person-Centered Journal, 7, 28-39.

3. Categories and Criteria for Inclusion

Based on the descriptions above, the Directory classifies person-centered and experiential orientations as being:

  • Classical Person-Centered or Client-Centered
  • Focusing-Oriented
  • Process Experiential/Emotion Focused
  • Person-Centered Expressive
  • Child-Centered Play Therapy
  • Other
  • Many

The “other” category includes programs and faculty who practice or teach other integrative or eclectic approaches that may not be exclusively person-centered in the traditional sense but which have a strong component of traditional person-centered principles and practices. The directory provides the opportunity for individuals to briefly explain what “other” means to them.

The “many” category describes programs, courses, and faculty that teach many, most or all of the orientations above.

To be included in the Directory one’s program or teaching need not be exclusively person-centered. For example, one may teach person-centered practice in some courses, yet one’s job description may include teaching other courses on evaluation, diagnosis and treatment planning. Or, like the editor of this directory did, one may teach an advanced counseling theories course that includes several in-depth sessions on the person-centered approach but also includes sessions on other counseling theories. Similarly a program need not be exclusively person-centered to be included (few are), but it should have a strong and identifiable person-centered component.

Further criteria are as follows:

  • Programs:
    These are university courses of study that (a) lead to a Masters or doctoral degree or certificate or credential in counseling, psychotherapy, clinical psychology, social work, or allied field in which the program contains a strong concentration of learning experiences in the person-centered approach, (b) lead to a degree, certification, certificate or other credential specifically in the person-centered or experiential approach, and/or (c) are conducted in a person-centered/student-centered manner, i.e., a facilitative learning environment with a high degree of the core conditions, student self-direction, self-evaluation, etc
  • Courses:
    We understand that virtually every counseling, clinical psychology, clinical social work, etc. program in the U.S. and Canada includes an opportunity for students to learn basic, empathic listening skills and includes a theories course that spends a week or two at the most on the person-centered approach. This level of concentration is not enough to qualify a course for inclusion in the directory. To be included, a university course should have a major focus (at least several sessions) on the person-centered or experiential approach.
  • Faculty:
    These are individual faculty members at universities for whom the person-centered/experiential approach is an important aspect of their belief system, which they infuse in their teaching, mentoring, supervision, research, clinical practice and/or thesis/dissertation sponsorship. Part-time faculty, adjunct faculty, and professors emeritus/emerita are eligible for inclusion if they still are available to work with students at their institution.

4. Process for Building the Directory 

The process so far has included the following steps:

  1. The editor sent out a request for submissions of programs, courses, faculty, etc. to programs and faculty he knew of, to various group lists, to programs and faculty who subsequently came to his attention, and to other interested parties.
  2. Programs, faculty, institutes, etc. returned the submission form with their information.
  3. The editor called or emailed contact persons who submitted the information to clarify any uncertain points
  4. The editor, usually in collaboration with the submitter, decided which entries fit the criteria for inclusion and edited any entries as needed.
  5. A draft of the directory was sent to all the contact persons and faculty included in the directory (a) for corrections, comments, critique and suggestions and (b) to send on to other colleagues known to them who are qualified to be included but are not yet included in the directory.
  6. A draft of the directory was sent to the members of ADPCA (a) for corrections, comments, critique and suggestions and (b) to send on to other colleagues known to them who are qualified to be included but are not yet included in the directory.

The directory will continually be updated and expanded over subsequent months and years. Hopefully it will continue to grow as more information on person-centered and experiential programs, courses, and faculty are identified, and as the person-centered approach achieves greater visibility and legitimacy in university settings.

5. Directory Overview by Region

A. University Faculty

Alberta

University of Alberta –William Whelton

California

California Institute for Integral Studies –Maria Gonzalez-Blue
Notre Dame de Namur University –Laury Rappaport
Santa Clara University –Dale Larson
Saybrook University –Natalie Rogers
Sonoma State University –Maria Hess

Florida

Nova Southeastern University –Eugene May

Hawaii

University of Hawaii –Ron Gordon

Illinois

Argosy University, Chicago –Marge Witty

Massachusetts

Lesley University –Joan Klagsbrun

Missouri

Missouri State University -Jeffrey Cornelius-White

New York

Nazareth College –Stephen Demanchick
St. John Fisher College –Rachel Jordan
University of Rochester –Howard Kirschenbaum

Ontario

University of Toronto -Jeanne Watson
York University –Leslie Greenberg
York University –Shake Toukmanian

Pennsylvania

Kutztown University –Jo Cohen Hamilton

Tennessee

University of Tennessee –Jeffrey Cochran

Texas

Sul Ross State University –Jay Downing
University of North Texas –Dee Ray

Washington

Seattle University –Kevin Krycka

B. University Courses

(See also University Program section for other course descriptions.)

 

California

California Institute for Integral Studies –Person-Centered Expressive Arts Therapy
Notre Dame de Namur University –Focusing-Oriented Art Therapy
Santa Clara University –Advanced Counseling Process and Skills
Sonoma State University –Introduction to Counseling

Florida

Nova Southeastern University –Humanistic Psychology

Illinois

Argosy University, Chicago –Person-Centered Therapy: Theory and Practice

Massachusetts

Lesley University -Focusing and Expressive Therapies
Lesley University –Focusing and Mindfulness: Awareness Practices for Counseling
Lesley University –Focusing and Listening: Essential Skills for Therapy

New York

Nazareth College –Foundations of Play Therapy

Pennsylvania

Kutztown University –Field Experience in Counseling
Kutztown University –Fundamentals of Counseling

Tennessee

University of Tennessee – Child-Centered Play Therapy

Texas

Sul Ross State University –Encountering the Person
Sul Ross State University –Humanistic Psychology

Washington

Seattle University –Experiential Theory and Practice
Seattle University –Basic Practicum Supervision

C. University Programs

California

Notre Dame de Namur University –Art Therapy; Marriage and Family Therapy
Saybrook University –Expressive Arts for Healing and Social Change: A Person-Centered Approach

Illinois

Argosy University, Chicago –Doctor of Psychology Program

Missouri

Missouri State University –Graduate Counseling Programs

Texas

University of North Texas –Counseling Program

Washington

Seattle University –Master of Arts in Existential - Phenomenological Therapeutic Psychology

Ontario

York University –Clinical Psychology

D. Institutes

California

Focusing and Expressive Arts Institute– Focusing-Oriented Arts Therapy Training

Illinois

The Carl Rogers Institute for Client-Centered Therapy– Externship Practica and Internships

New York

The Focusing Institute of New York– Focusing-Oriented Psychotherapy

6. Full Directory Listings

A. University Faculty

Argosy University, Chicago; Chicago, Illinois
Faculty Member: Marge Witty, Psy.D.
Rank: Professor
Dept./Div.: Department of Clinical Psychology
Email: mwitty@argosy.edu
Phone: 773-327-1046
Orientation: Classical Client-Centered

 

California Institute for Integral Studies(offers accredited graduate programs)
Faculty Member: Maria Gonzalez-Blue, M.A.
Rank: Associate Professor
Licenses, Creds: Registered Expressive Arts Therapist; Registered Expressive Arts Consultant/Educator
Dept./Div.: Counseling Psychology
Email: hummingbird@monitor.net
Phone: 707-823-2889
Orientation: Person-Centered Expressive Arts Therapy
Orientation in Practice: I provide an experiential and didactic introduction to integrated arts processes in therapy and for therapeutic value, including arts for self-healing and spiritual exploration. I stay open to listen and learn. I see myself as a compassionate companion on the path of students/clients/participants, modeling a person-centered way, hoping all three core aspects arrive together.

 

Kutztown University, Kutztown, Pennsylvania
Faculty Member: Jo Cohen Hamilton, Ph.D.
Rank: Associate Professor
Licenses, Creds: Licensed Psychologist, National Certified Counselor
Dept./Div.: Counseling and Human Services
Email: Hamilton@kutztown.edu
Phone: 610-683-4211
Orientation: Classical clent-centered blended with openness to other theories and methods,particularly those of interest to students.
Orientation in Practice: I am more instructional and theoretical with students than clients, but I hold to the same person-centered principles, values and belief. I deeply value my students’ interests, am open-minded and respectful of a wide range of theories, and I don’t play the “my theory’s better than your theory” game. I allow students to define the direction of supervision, just as I allow clients to define the direction of counseling. Multiple students have presented with me at person-centered conferences.

 

Lesley University, Cambridge, Massachusetts
Faculty Member: Joan Klagsbrun, Ph.D.
Rank: Adjunct Faculty
Licenses, Creds: Licensed Psychologist
Dept./Div.: Counseling Psychology
Email: joanklag@mac.com
Phone: 617-924-8515
Orientation: Focusing-oriented
Orientation in Practice: In my clinical work, supervision and teaching, I hold the assumption that with a supportive empathic attitude on the part of the therapist, supervisor or techer and with the help of the Focusing approach, people can access deeper levels of awareness, wisdom, and right next steps for their lives. I don’t see Focusing as exclusive to other methods but a way to honor the knowing that resides in each of us, and so this method is compatible with many other methods.

 

Missouri State University, Springfield, Missouri
Faculty Member: Jeffrey H.D. Cornelius-White, Psy.D.
Rank: Associate Professor
Dept./Div.: Counseling, Leadership and Special Education
Email: jcornelius-white@missouristate.edu
Phone: 417-836-6517
Orientation: Person-centered integrative
Orientation in Practice: I am most influenced in training and therapy/supervisory practice by the nondirective, client-centered, or classical style and in instructional practice by learner-centered education movements, but have a deep appreciation for other humanistic and relational approaches. I have assessed my teaching and therapy through assessments created by Barbara Brodley and Barbara McCombs showing high adherence to the nondirective and learner-centered models within therapy and training contexts. I share choice and control with students to the extent possible yet fit within conventional training guidelines. [At Missouri State, students may focus on child-centered play therapy, emotion-focused couples therapy, or other person-centered approaches within a school or community counseling Masters degree program.] Additionally, I serve on dissertation committees in the collaborative doctoral degree in educational leadership and policy analysis where students can weave in person-centered themes.

 

Nazareth College, Rochester, New York
Faculty Member: Stephen Demanchick, Ph.D.
Rank: Professor
Licenses, Creds: LMHC, RPT, NCC
Dept./Div.: Creative Arts Therapy Department
Email: sdemanc8@naz.edu
Phone: 585-389-2545
Orientation: Child-Centered Play Therapist
Orientation in Practice: My practice is centered within child-centered play therapy principles. I also incorporate person-centered and child-centered philosophies into the content of my courses when appropriate.

 

Notre Dame de Namur University, Belmont, California
Faculty Member: Laury Rappaport, Ph.D.
Rank: Associate Professor
Licenses, Creds: Board Certified Art Therapist; Registered Expressive Arts Therapist; Certified Focusing Coordinator and Focusing-Oriented Therapist with The Focusing Institute
Dept./Div.: Art Therapy Psychology Department
Email: lrappaport@ndnu.edu
Phone: 650-508-3674
Website: www.ndnu.edu/academics/schools-programs/school-sciences/art-therapy-psyc...
Orientation: Focusing-Oriented/Person-Centered.(I specialize in the integration of Focusing and the arts therapies and pioneered the development of Focusing-Oriented Art Therapy and Focusing-Oriented Expressive Arts Therapy.)
Orientation in Practice: I integrate brief Focusing moments into teaching. I also teach a course on Focusing-Oriented Art Therapy. I bring in Focusing and Focusing-Oriented Arts Therapy into teaching, clinical application, and research. I also teach the Thesis courses and am interested in working with students to integrate Person-Centered and Focusing-Oriented approaches in their research.

 

Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Faculty Member: Eugene P. May, Ph.D.
Rank: Part-time Core Faculty
Dept./Div.: Center for Psychological Studies
Email: eugenepmay@aol.com
Phone: 954-771-5354
Orientation: Classical Person-Centered
Orientation in Practice: Person-centered orientation permeates my teaching (including Humanistic Therapy, Group Theory or Processes courses), intensive supervision of practicum students, and relationship with students.

 

Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, California
Faculty Member: Dale G. Larson, Ph.D.
Rank: Professor
Licenses, Creds:  
Dept./Div.: Counseling Psychology
Email: dlarson@scu.edu
Phone: 408-554-4320
Orientation: Process-Experiential/Emotion-Focused
Orientation in Practice: A Person-centered orientation is the foundation for my counseling and health psychology courses, including my grief counseling class.

 

Saybrook University, San Francisco, California
Faculty Member: Natalie Rogers, Ph.D.
Rank: Distinguished Consulting Faculty
Licenses, Creds: Registered Expressive Art Therapist
Dept./Div.: Humanistic and Transpersonal Psychology
Email: nrogers@nrogers.com
Phone: 707-824-8820
Orientation: Person-Centered Expressive Art Therapy
Orientation in Practice: Organized and teaches in an intensive, 6-course, 400-hour program at Saybrook leading to a certificate in Person-Centered Expressive Art Therapy, an approach she developed based on Carl Rogers’ values, core conditions, and methods of facilitating that incorporates the use of movement, visual art, music and sound, journal writing and psychodrama in a safe, nonjudgmental, permissive environment to foster creative, authenticity and self-determined goals.

 

Seattle University, Seattle, Washington
Faculty Member: Kevin C. Krycka, Psy.D.
Rank: Associate Professor
Dept./Div.: Psychology Department, College of Arts and Sciences
Email: krycka@seattleu.edu
Phone: 206-296-5398
Website: www.seattleu.edu/artsci/map
Orientation: Person-centered and experiential focusing oriented
Orientation in Practice: As an academic, person-centered and focusing orientated therapy are incorporated in courses: abnormal psychology, introduction to psychology, and graduate courses. I am a part-time Focusing Oriented Psychotherapist.

 

Sonoma State University, Rohnert Park, California
Faculty Member: Maria Hess, Ph.D., MFT
Rank: Associate Professor
Dept./Div.: Psychology Department
Email: maria.hess@sonoma.edu
Phone: 707-664-2413
Orientation: Classical client-centered in teaching and with beginning therapists; humanistic/transpersonal clinical educator and psychotherapist.
Orientation in Practice: Genuineness, authenticity, positive regard, empathy are at the core of everything I teach. I attempt to model for my students a person-centered worldview. I value Humanistic tenets and like to be congruent in living them as I teach about them.

 

St. John Fisher College, Rochester. New York
Faculty Member: Rachel A. Jordan, Ph.D.
Rank: Assistant Professor; Director, Mental Health Counseling Program
Licenses, Creds: LMHC, NCC
Dept./Div.: Wegmans School of Nursing
Email: rjordan@sjfc.edu
Phone: 585-899-3858
Orientation: Classical Person-Centered
Orientation in Practice: My teaching is often discussion-based and non-directive. In supervision I put the core conditions in the forefront of our interactions, and in group supervision invite the group to share in a way that meets their needs with little structure or direction placed on the process. Most profoundly, in my mentoring and advising roles I convey dilemmas and concerns in a genuine and empathic way while still prizing students and their efforts to find their way and be successful students, counselors and human beings.

 

Sul Ross State University, Alpine, Texas
Faculty Member: Jay Downing, Ph.D.
Rank: Professor and Chairman
Dept./Div.: Dept. of Behavioral and Social Sciences
Email: jdowning@sulross.edu
Phone: 432-837-8163
Orientation: Person-Centered (esp. the values Rogers espoused from the early 1960s)
Orientation in Practice: I implement student-centered values in all my undergraduate and graduate courses, encouraging both affective and cognitive growth. Took student-centered teaching to Croatia. My research is also influenced by the person-centered approach, including examining empathy as a way to reduce mortality salience effects on the judgment of those we might otherwise dehumanize.

 

University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta
Faculty Member: William Whelton, Ph.D.
Rank: Associate Professor
Dept./Div.: Department of Educational Psychology
Email: wwhelton@ualberta.ca
Phone: 780-492-7979
Orientation: Emotion-Focused, Process-Experiential, Person-Centered
Orientation in Practice: Strong focus in my teaching and supervision and clinical work — trusting the growth edge of the client, trust in the process, the cruicial importance of the relational conditions for the development of a strong therapeutic relationship. I teach a lot of what Laura Rice called “evocative empathy”.

 

University of Hawaii at Hilo, Hilo, Hawaii
Faculty Member: Ronald Gordon, Ph.D.
Rank: Professor
Dept./Div.: Department of Communication
Email: rgordon@hawaii.edu
Phone: 808-974-7479
Orientation: Person-centered
Orientation in Practice: I teach courses in Interpersonal Communication, Seminar in Human Dialogue, Seminar in Listening, and Communication in Leadership, all from a person-centered perspective (though our program as a whole is not person-centered).

 

University of North Texas, Denton, Texas
Faculty Member: Dee Ray, Ph.D.
Rank: Associate Professor
Licenses, Creds: Licensed Professional Counselor-Supervisor (TX), National Certified Counselor, Registered Play Therapist-Supervisor
Dept./Div.: Department of Counseling and Higher Education
Email: dee.ray@unt.edu
Phone: 940-565-2066
Orientation: Child-Centered Play Therapy
Orientation in Practice: I teach play therapy courses (basic and advanced), school counseling, and clinical master’s and doctoral internships. In the didactic courses, I teach the application of person centered theory with children through play therapy and how to infuse person centered concepts in the school comprehensive developmental guidance program. As a clinical supervisor, I supervise students in Child Centered Play Therapy (CCPT), helping them to apply theory to current clinical cases. I’ve published multiple research studies on the effectiveness of CCPT, including impact on children with attention problems, exhibiting aggression, developmental levels, and parent child relationships. I also developed a course specifically on how to conduct research in CCPT to further the evidence base for practice and wrote the CCPT manual for use in research. I chair dissertations on CCPT or the philosophy related to CCPT. I currently supervise many counselors on a weekly basis on the use of CCPT.

 

University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario
Faculty Member: Jean Watson, Ph.D.
Rank: Professor
Dept./Div.: Adult Education and Counseling Psychology Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
Email: Jeanne.Watson@utoronto.ca
Phone: 416-978-0705
Orientation: Person-Centered, Experiential, Emotion-Focused Therapy
Orientation in Practice: Teaching, supervision, research, mentoring.

 

York University, Toronto, Ontario
Faculty Member: Leslie Greenberg, Ph.D.
Rank: Professor
Licenses, Creds: Registered Psychologist
Dept./Div.: Psychology
Email: lgrnebrg@yorku.ca
Phone: 416-736-2100, Ext. 66111
Orientation: Emotion-Focused Therapy
Orientation in Practice: In teaching, clinical work, supervision, mentoring, research, and thesis/dissertation sponsorship.
 
Faculty Member: Shake G. Toukmanian, Ph.D.
Rank: Professor Emerita
Dept./Div.: Faculty of Health, Department of Psychology
Email: stouk@yorku.ca
Phone: 416-736-2100 Ext. 33132
Orientation: Perception-focused Experiential approach to therapy with adults (Given that perception is at the Core of person-centered orientation, this model draws on relevant concepts from cognitive theory to provide a conceptual framework that helps enhance our understanding of what critical processes, occurring within the clients’ perceptual-processing system, mediate therapeutic improvement.)
Orientation in Practice: In light of my experiential orientation, the fundamental tenets of the person-centered approach are an integral part of my teaching, supervisory work, and clinical practice. As well, the person-centered orientation looms large in my own as well as in the dissertation and thesis research of my students (e.g, identifying and comparing patters of perceptual-processing strategies associated with productive segments or sessions within and across various experiential and other forms of therapy, examining the differential effect of certain qualities in therapist manner of responding on productive patters of client processing, etc.

B. University Courses
(Note: “Faculty” means faculty member(s) teaching the course.)

Argosy University, Chicago; Chicago, Illinois
Course Title: Person-Centered Therapy: Theory and Practice
Level: Masters, Doctoral
Dept./Div.: Department of Clinical Psychology
Faculty: M. Witty (contact person), Ted Welsch, Margaret Warner
Email: mwitty@argosy.edu
Phone: 773-327=-1046
Orientation: From Classical Person-Centered to Experiential
Person-Centered Aspects: Focus of the course in Carl Rogers’ theory papers and Brodley’s papers on practice.

 

California Institute for Integral Studies, San Francisco, California
Course Title: Person-Centered Expressive Arts Therapy
Level: Masters
Dept./Div.: Counseling Psychology, concentration in Expressive Arts Therapy
Faculty: Maria Gonzalex-Blue
Email: hummingbird@monitor.net
Phone: 707-823-2889
Orientation: Person-Centered Expressive Arts Therapy.
Person-Centered Aspects: Experiential and didactic introduction to person-centered approach to therapy and group process using expressive arts: visual arts, movement/dance, writing. sound. Strong emphasis on deep listening. Introduction to multi-modal arts processes and to Natalie Rogers Creative Connection®. Throughout course students are guided in using person-centered communication while interacting, while in counseling practicum, and in responding to art processes.

 

Kutztown University, Kutztown, Pennsylvania
Course Title: Field Experience in Counseling
Level: Masters
Dept./Div.: Department of Counseling and Human Services
Faculty: Jo Cohen Hamilton
Email: Hamilton@kutztown.edu
Phone: 610-683-4211
Website: www.kutztown.edu/academics/graduate/chs/
Orientation: Classical Client-Centered Supervision
Person-Centered Aspects: Audio and video tape review using traditional client-centered supervision methods of exploring counselor reactions, generating empathic responses, and enhancing understanding of client expression. Includes peer supervision involving counselor role play of client and peer supervisor practice in client-centered responding. Also incorporates self-development groups modeled after person-centered experiential groups, and self-evaluation methods.

 

Kutztown University, Kutztown, Pennsylvania
Course Title: Fundamentals of Counseling
Level: Masters
Dept./Div.: Department of Counseling and Human Services
Faculty: Jo Cohen Hamilton
Email: Hamilton@kutztown.edu
Phone: 610-683-4211
Website: www.kutztown.edu/academics/graduate/chs/
Orientation: Classical client-centered foundations for counseling and psychotherapy practice
Person-Centered Aspects: Audio and video taped peer counseling sessions that apply the core conditions. Transcript analysis to explore counselor’s client-centered capacities and to generate alternative empathic responses. Students also complete an empathy exercise, which journals a 10-week application of client-centered attitudes with two individuals. Class discussions utilize person-centered responding to student communication.

 

Lesley University, Cambridge, Massachusetts
Course Title: Focusing and Expressive Therapies
Level: Masters
Dept./Div.: Expressive Therapies Division, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Faculty: Laury Rappaport, Ph.D.
Email: laury@focusingarts.com
Phone: 707-569-6264
Website: www.lesley.edu/gsass/56etp.html
Orientation: Focusing-oriented
Person-Centered Aspects: The course provides a foundation in Focusing, listening, and a Person-Centered theoretical framework and is integrated with the principles and practices of expressive arts therapy.

 

Lesley University, Cambridge, Massachusetts
Course Title: Focusing and Mindfulness: Awareness Practices for Counseling
Level: Masters
Dept./Div.: Counseling Psychology, Graduate Division
Faculty: Joan Klagsbrun, Ron Seigel
Email: joanklag@mac.com
Phone: 617-924-8515
Orientation: Focusing
Person-Centered Aspects: This course teaches the theory, research, and practice of Focusing and Mindfulness, and demonstrates the application of these methods to both the practice of psychotherapy and to the self-care of therapists.

 

Lesley University, Cambridge, Massachusetts
Course Title: Focusing and Listening: Essential Skills for Therapy
Level: Counseling Psychology, Graduate Division
Dept./Div.: Counseling Psychology, Graduate Division
Faculty: Joan Klagsbrun, Ron Seigel
Email: joanklag@mac.com
Phone: 617-924-8515
Orientation: Focusing, Person-Centered

 

Nazareth College, Rochester, New York
Course Title: Foundations of Play Therapy
Level: Masters
Dept./Div.: Creative Arts Therapy Department
Faculty: Stephen Demanchick
Email: sdemanc8@naz.edu
Phone: 585-389-2545
Orientation: Child-Centered Play Therapy
Person-Centered Aspects: Covers many theoretical approaches to play therapy; however, the core content area of this course is focused on child-centered play therapy.

 

Notre Dame de Namur University, Belmont, California
Course Title: Focusing-Oriented Art Therapy
Level: Masters
Dept./Div.: Art Therapy Psychology Department
Faculty: Laury Rappaport, Ph.D.
Email: lrappaport@ndnu.edu
Phone: 650-508-3674
Website: www.ndnu.edu/academics/schools-programs/school-sciences/art-therapy-psyc...
Orientation: Focusing-oriented
Person-Centered Aspects: This course provides a foundation in Focusing, listening, and a Person-Centered theoretical framework and is integrated with the principles and practices of art therapy.

 

Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL
Course Title: Humanistic Psychotherapy
Level: Doctoral
Dept./Div.: Center for Psychological Studies
Faculty: Eugene May
Email: eugenepmay@aol.com
Phone: 954-771-5354
Orientation: Classical Person-Centered
Person-Centered Aspects: Emphasis on: Rogers’ self-actualizing view of human nature; the therapist (as person, values, attitudes, beliefs); core conditions of therapeutic relationship; implanting the conditions; contrast with medical model therapy; harmful effects of “diagnosis”.

 

Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, California
Course Title: Advanced Counseling Process and Skills
Level: Master’s
Dept./Div.: Counseling Psychology
Faculty: Dale G. Larson, Ph.D.
Email: dlarson@scu.edu
Phone: 408-554-4320
Website: Hospice Home Page: www.scu.edu/hospice
Orientation: Process-Experiential/Emotion-Focused
Person-Centered Aspects: Integrative skill-building class using Learning Emotion Focused Therapy as the main text, including focusing and other experiential interventions.

 

Seattle University, Seattle, Washington
Course Title: Basic Practicum Supervision
Level: Masters
Dept./Div.: Psychology Department, College of Arts and Sciences
Faculty: Kevin C. Krycka, Psy.D.
Email: krycka@seattleu.edu
Phone: 206-296-5398
Website: www.seattleu.edu/artsco/map
Orientation: Focusing-Oriented, Experiential
Person-Centered Aspects: Students develop deep listening skills in group and in work with clients, develop collegue relationships with fellow group members, learn reflection techniques, discuss Rogers and Gendlin.

 

Seattle University, Seattle, Washington
Course Title: Experiential Theory and Practice
Level: Masters
Dept./Div.: Psychology Department, College of Arts and Sciences
Faculty: Kevin C. Krycka
Email: krycka@seattleu.edu
Phone: 206-296-5398
Orientation: Focusing
Person-Centered Aspects: The philosophy of Gendlin and Focusing are the core of the course, including empathic listening skills, building groups, focsing practice dyads, and clinical application.

 

Sonoma State University, Rohnert Park, California
Course Title: Introduction to Counseling
Level: Undergraduate
Dept./Div.: Psychology Department
Faculty: Maria Hess
Email: maria.hess@sonoma.edu
Phone: 707-664-2413
Orientation: Classical client-centered
Person-Centered Aspects: 16-week course with 8-week component of co-counseling outside of class, while in class we study the foundation of client-centered counseling a la Rogers. We have discussions, read text, watch movies and role play client-centered counseling, then use same guiding principles of unconditional positive regard, authenticity and empathy to give feedback to training counselors.

 

Sul Ross State University, Alpine, Texas
Course Title: Encountering the Person
Level: Undergraduate
Dept./Div.: Undergraduate Psychology Program, Dept. of Behavioral and Social Sciences.
Faculty: Jay Downing
Email: jdowning@sulross.edu
Phone: 432-837-8163
Orientation: Person-Centered
Person-Centered Aspects: Students learn about encounter groups and their facilitation via both participation in an encounter group and classic and contemporary readings on encounter groups and their processes. Final segment of course allows students to connect their cognitive knowledge with their personal experiences attained during the group experience.

 

Sul Ross State University, Alpine, Texas
Course Title: Humanistic Psychology
Level: Masters
Dept./Div.: Graduate Program in Psychology, Dept. of Behavioral and Social Sciences
Faculty: Jay Downing
Email: jdowning@sulross.edu
Phone: 432-837-8163
Orientation: Person-Centered
Person-Centered Aspects: Emphasis of 15-week course is an in-depth examination of Rogers and the Person-Centered Approach through consideration of classic and modern works in the field. Developing the core conditions is encouraged by experiential work, including encounter group participation in one segment of the course, clinical and counseling situations, role-playing person-centered therapeutic situations, education, and other aspects of life.

 

University of Hawaii at Hilo, Hilo, Hawaii
Course Title: Interpersonal Communication
Level: Undergraduate
Dept./Div.: Department of Communication / Humanities Division
Faculty: Ronald D. Gordon
Email: rgordon@hawaii.edu
Phone: 808-974-7479
Website: www.uhh.hawaii.edu/catalog/communication.html
Orientation: Experiential, Humanistic
Person-Centered Aspects: Course includes student-centered dialogues around selected interpersonal communication models, concepts, and principles as they function in our daily lives. We approach “interpersonal” communication within a dialogical container based upon warmth, empathy, and genuineness. In each class we use the “wisdom circle” process in which students respond to meaningful self-disclosure questions posed by a student leader for that session. The course has an empowering effect upon most of the students enrolled, and they exit with strong appreciation for Carl Rogers’ “Big Three.”

 

University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee
Course Title: Child-Centered Play Therapy
Level: Masters, Doctoral
Dept./Div.: Counselor Education, in Department of Educational Psychology and Counseling
Faculty: Jeff L. Cochran and Nancy H. Cochran
Email: jcochr11@utk.edu
Phone: 865-974-4178
Orientation: Child-Centered Play Therapy
Person-Centered Aspects: This is a skill-based course from which students can begin to practice Child-Centered Play Therapy under supervision or can use the principles of CCPT to inform their broader understanding of and approach to counseling, e.g., with adolescents or adults.

C. University Programs

It is understood that in the U.S. and Canada it is difficult to offer a graduate program in exclusively one counseling or therapeutic approach. Accreditation standards typically require all programs to provide a broad range of theoretical approaches and practical applications and to cover a great number of subjects from group work to addictions to multicultural issues to diagnosis and treatment planning. For a program to describe itself as person-centered (in any of its forms), then, does not imply that the program primarily teaches that approach, but that it has managed to build enough person-centered and experiential elements into its program to distinguish it from other programs, while still meeting all the other requirements for accreditation.

Argosy University, Chicago; Chicago, Illinois
Program Name: Doctor of Psychology Program
Degrees Offered: Psy.D.
Dept./Div.: Dept. of Clinical Psychology
Contact Person: Marjorie Witty, Ph.D.
Contact’s Email: mwitty@argosy.edu
Contact’s Phone: 773-327-1046
Orientation: Generalist Curriculum with strong Client-Centered Therapy (CCT, classical) and CCT-Experiential component.
Brief Description: Includes courses in Person-Centered Therapy: Theory and Practice; Advanced Person-Centered; Personal and Professional Development; Groups led by Person-Centered therapists; Master’s and doctoral therapy and diagnostic practicum seminars.
Faculty: Drs. M. Witty, M. Warner, Ted Welsch, Kathy Moon, MA, Jerome Wilczynski.

 

Missouri State University, Springfield, Missouri
Program Name: Graduate Counseling Programs
Degrees Offered: M.S. in School or Community Counseling
Dept./Div.: Counseling, Leadership and Special Education
Contact Person: Jeffrey H.D. Cornelius-White, Psy.D.
Contact’s Email: jcornelius-white@missouristate.edu
Contact’s Phone: 417-836-6517
Website: http://education.missouristate.edu/counseling/default.htm
Orientation: Integrative/eclectic, not purely aligned with person-centered, but mission statement and conceptual foundation focus on helping relationships and humanistic common factors. Likewise, individual faculty, initiatives, and courses hold specific orientations: child centered play, classical, expressive arts, emotion-focused couples counseling, and experiential.
Brief Description: Foundational course on Helping Relationships emphasizing core dispositions of person-centered therapy; encounter group style class usually conducted in classical or experiential manner; required course in child-centered play therapy for students studying to work with elementary level children; other elective and required courses that include emphases on person-centered approaches; student attendance at person-centered conferences; many faculty who are friendly to and supportive of theses and dissertations with various person-centered foci.

 

Notre Dame de Namur University, Belmont, California
Program Name: Art Therapy; Marriage and Family Therapy
Degrees Offered: M.A. in Marriage and Family Therapy; M.A. in Art Therapy; Post-Masters 30-unit Art Therapy option
Dept./Div.: Art Therapy Psychology Department
Contact Person: Laury Rappaport, Ph.D.
Contact’s Email: lrappaport@ndnu.edu
Contact’s Phone: 650-508-3674
Website: www.ndnu.edu/academics/schools-programs/school-science/art-therapy-psych...
Orientation: While not solely a Person-Centered program, various theoretical orientations are taught including Person-Centered and Focusing-Oriented Art Therapy.
Brief Description: Course in Focusing-Oriented Art Therapy. Person-Centered Therapy is taught as part of Communication and Counseling Skills as well as other foundational courses. Students may choose Person-Centered Therapy as a theoretical framework to do a major Orals Presentation on a case or other clinical material.

 

Saybrook University, San Francisco, California
Program Name: Expressive Arts for Healing and Social Change: A Person-Centered Approach
Certificate Offered: Certificate in Person-Centered Expressive Arts Therapy
Dept./Div.: Humanistic and Transpersonal Psychology
Contact Person: Natalie Rogers, Ph.D.
Contact’s Email: nrogers@nrogers.com
Contact’s Phone: 707-824-8820
Website: www.nrogers.com
Orientation: Person-Centered Expressive Art Therapy
Brief Description: An in-depth program teaching the person-centered approach in conjunction with the expressive arts. A 16-unit, 400-hour training program leading to a certificate. Includes 6 one-week residencies spread out over two years. Residency course titles are: I. Expressive Arts and Nourishing the Soul, II. Client-Centered Expressive Arts for Counseling,III. Expressive Arts and the Wisdom of the Body, IV. Expressive Arts for Social Change, V & VI. Expressive Arts: Group Dynamics and Facilitation I and II. Courses involve experiential work followed by presentations and discussion, demonstrations, skill development, readings, papers and a creative project. Courses taught by Natalie Rogers, Shellee David and Sue Ann Herron.

 

Seattle University, Seattle, Washington
Program Name: Master of Arts in Existential-Phenomenological Therapeutic Psychology
Degrees Offered: Masters
Dept./Div.: College of Arts and Sciences
Contact Person: Kevin C. Krycka, Psy.D.
Contact’s Email: krycka@seattleu.edu
Contact’s Phone: 206-296-5398
Website: www.seattleu.edu/artsci/map
Orientation: Existential-phenomenological incorporating Experiential-Focusing
Brief Description: Key faculty: Kevin Krycka. Courses: Experiential Theory and Practice; Clinical Supervision from an experiential-focusing perspective; MA Thesis option using Focusing-Oriented Therapy and qualitative methods.

 

University of North Texas, Denton, Texas
Program Name: Counseling Program
Degrees Offered: M.Ed., M.S., Ph.D.
Dept./Div.: Department of Counseling and Higher Education
Contact Person: Dr. Dee Ray
Contact’s Email: dee.ray@unt.edu
Contact’s Phone: 940-565-2066
Orientation: Child-Centered Play Therapy
Brief Description: UNT Counseling UNT Counseling Program offers a series of Child Centered Play Therapy (CCPT) courses including Introduction to Play Therapy (taught only from person-centered theory), Group Play Therapy (50% of course committed to group play therapy from p-c theory), Filial Therapy (taught only from p-c theory), Advanced Play Therapy (50% of course taught from p-c theory), Research in Play Therapy (how to conduct child-centered play therapy research), and Clinical Practicum & Internship (supervised from p-c theory if chosen by student). We also manage two community clinics that serve low income clients in which counseling is conducted by practicum and internship students. All play therapy is conducted according to CCPT practices. The clinics are supervised by licensed professional counselor supervisors, according to CCPT principles. Five faculty members teach in the CCPT series including Drs. Dee Ray, Assoc. Prof.; Garry Landreth, Prof.; Sue Bratton, Prof., Natalya Edwards, Asst. Prof.; and Leslie Jones, Lecturer.

 

York University, Toronto, Ontario
Program Name: Clinical Psychology
Degrees Offered: Ph.D.
Dept./Div.: Psychology
Contact Person: Les Greenberg, Ph.D.
Contact’s Email: lgrnebrg@yorku.ca
Contact’s Phone: 416-736-2100, Ext. 66111
Website: www.emotionfocused.clinic.org
Orientation: Emotion-focused
Brief Description: Introductory graduate curse in theory and intervention is client-centered based. Advanced intervention is Client-Centered and Emotion-Focused. Emotion-Focused/Client-Centered student research is supported.

D. Institutes This section is for institutes and organizations that offer a certificate, credential or other extensive training program in the person-centered or experiential approach.

 

The Carl Rogers Institute for Client-Centered Therapy, Chicago, Illinois
Name of Program: Externship Practica and Internships
Credentials Offered: Future certificate program(s) for Client-Centered therapists are in the planning stages.
Contact Persons: Dr. Kevin Kukoleck or Brian Burgess
Phone: 773-405-3541 or 773-318-2361
Email: kevinpsyd@yahoo.com or psychbrian@yahoo.com
Website: www.thenewcenterchicago.com
Orientation: Client-Centered
Description: Masters’ and doctoral level internship and externship practica for diagnostic, therapy, and advanced therapy training. Post-doctoral fellowship available. Client-Centered Play therapy, Couples therapy, group therapy and Individual therapy training.

 

Focusing and Expressive Arts Institute, Santa Rosa, California
Name of Program: Focusing-Oriented Arts Therapy Training
Credentials Offered: Certified Focusing-Oriented Therapist (through the Focusing Institute); Certified Focusing Professional (through the Focusing Institute); Certified Focusing-Oriented Arts Therapy Trainer (through the Focusing and Expressive Arts Institute)
Contact Persons: Laury Rappaport
Phone: 707-569-6264
Email: lrappaport@ndnu.edu
Website: www.focusingarts.com
Orientation: Focusing-Oriented with Arts Therapies
Description: Training in Focusing-Oriented Art Therapy and Focusing-Oriented Expressive Arts Therapy. Person-Centered aspects are interwoven into the program (i.e., Rogers’ conditions of worth, client-centered theory, active listening, etc.). In addition, related programs in Focusing and he expressive arts therapies are also offered.

 

The Focusing Institute of New York, New York City and elsewhere
Name of Program: Focusing-Oriented Psychotherapy
Credentials Offered: Certification in Focusing-Oriented Therapy
Contact Persons: Melinda Darer at the Focusing Institute
Contact person for training in Boston: Joan Klagsbrun
Email: joanklag@mac.com
Website: www.focusing.org
Orientation: Focusing-Oriented Psychotherapy
Description: A 1½-year training program in Focusing-Oriented Psychotherapy that includes self care for the therapist, partnership skill development, theory and practice, and supervision. The program takes 18 months and 108 hours of class time plus an hour a week of practice with partners in Focusing. The program is competency based so that skills are evaluated as the person moves through the program.

7. Submission Forms for New Entries

We are certain that there are many person-centered and experiential faculty, courses, programs and/or institutes in the U.S. and Canada not yet included in this Directory. To submit additional entries for the U.S and Canada you would like to have included, download the Submission Form. The listing is free of charge for all institutions.

8. Additional Directory Category: Non-Academic, Non-Credential Offering Institutions*

*This additional section is not edited by Howard Kirschenbaum.

This category is under development and will relate to institutions in the U.S. and Canada that provide theoretical and/or practical learning programs in the person-centered or experiential approach, without however offering academic credentials or certification. If you would like to join this forthcoming category, click on Submission Form.